The CB Years…

In 1976 I met someone who was using a CB radio. Till that day I never had heard about this hobby. In that time CB was illegal in the Netherlands and I remember we drove in his car, around the city of Leeuwarden, to find a spot where he could demonstrate his radio. I was impressed and it was about one week later that I bought my 1st CB radio. It was a crystal based 6 channel Pony radio, the CB 74.

Pony CB 74
Pony CB 74

With a mobile whip on the central heating system in my appartment I made my 1st QSO’s. The handle used at that time was Charley Tango Mike. Heard a lot more then I could reach but it was a fascinating time. I learned from my parents that radio was something I liked a lot when I was a little boy, I was always playing with the LW/MW/SW receiver in the house, most of the time to riddles and diddles I know now as CW and RTTY…

It did not take a long time and the Pony was sold and a Samdo 700 radio came in the house. It was a 40 channel AM radio. It also was about 3 channels wide, not the best CB radio ever made…

Samdo 700
Samdo 700

That one I owned for about 6 weeks because then I learned about SSB and had to have a SSB radio. My first SSB radio was a Colt 485-DX, a 40 channel radio that was expanded to 80 channels.

Colt 485 DX
Colt 485 DX

In april 1979 I moved to the Island Schiermonnikoog, one of the islands in the north of the Netherlands. This was a wonderfull location, very low manmade noise, no industry and only inhabitants of this island may drive a car.

I now entered a time in my life where I owned a lot of radio’s, trying them out and selling them again to get something more beautyfull or better. (Or worse…)

To mention a few:

Hy-gain V a 40 Channel AM/SSB radio, followed a Hy-gain V +40 -40 version. This one had 40 channels lower and 40 channels higher than normal CB.

Hygain V
Hygain V

Then I found the, now legendary, frequency 27.805 where lots of Dutch people abroad where hiding. It was (and still is!) a good organised DX club, the Whisky Oscar club with members all over the world. And a lot of the people who were pirating on 27 Mhz then, are now, just as I am, licenced amateurs… I was never a member of this club but I remember the good times we had on 27.805 or around. 805 was the calling frequency, after the first contact you were supposed to QSY to another frequency. Charley Tango Mike was gone, I changed to Kilo Mike as my local call, I used 1GP51 for DX.

In and out they went, sometimes I had more than one in the house but this is a few other radio’s I owned.

The Teaberry Stalker IX a 80 channels radio. The Hi Lo switch selected the 40 normal or 40 higher channels.

Teaberry Stalker IX
Teaberry Stalker IX

President Madison 80 Channels, my radio had also FM mode.

President Madison
President Madison

Royce 642 80 Channels AM/SSB no FM

Royce 642
Royce 642

Ham International Multimode 3,  5 * 40 Channels AM/FM/SSB

HAM International Multimode 3
HAM International Multimode 3

Sommerkamp 788-DX CC, 26-30 Mhz, This radio was also known as “The CoffeeHeater”.

Sommerkamp TS-788DX CC
Sommerkamp TS-788DX CC

Midland 7001 400 Channel AM/FM/SSB worked from 26.005 up to 29.995. Without a doubt the best CB radio I ever had…

Midland 7001
Midland 7001

President Jackson, now called “Jackson Classic”, 200 Channels AM/FM/SSB.

President Jackson
President Jackson

Ham International Jumbo 120 Channels, AM/FM/SSB

HAM International Jumbo
HAM International Jumbo

All these radio’s are long gone except the Ham international Jumbo. I owned that one till 2008 when I sold it on a Ham Fair to make money for some new gear. It was still in good condition transmitting and receiving well.

For a while I used a linear amplifier, a Kris Big Boomer. This it was a 10 / 6 meter amplifier, mine was adapted to 26-28 Mhz. 400 Watt PEP with only 10 Watt in…

Kris Big Boomer
Kris Big Boomer

In March 1980 CB was legalised in the Netherlands. But for the “older gang” this was not much of a real good thing. We were only allowed to use 22 channels, 0.5 watt in FM modulation. You had to register the use of CB and pay FL 35,- for it. For me the only good thing about this MARC permission was that the antenna on my house was not so strange anymore because lots of people put an CB antenna on the roof. I did register and used a few allowed CB radio’s. Needless to say that the allowed radio was visible and the illegal one in the drawer. On the island were a few DXers, Kees Kilo Delta, he had an 2WO number also, don’t remember exactly but 2WO153 keeps coming up my mind. Also Dennis Delta Sierra and myself Kees Kilo Mike (Or Charlie Tango Mike…) In this MARC period there were a lot of new stations, most of them only worked the 22 allowed channels but some of them also SSB. Like Chris Charlie November and Rob Romeo Victor. Rob passed the novice lincence end 2009, he is now PD9R.

Some of the MARC radio’s I used:

The Hy-Com CB-4000

Hy-Com CB-4000
Hy-Com CB-4000

The President KP77

Hy-Com CB-4000
President KP77

The Midland 77-FM-005

Midland 77-FM-005
Midland 77-FM-005

The Danita 640, 40 Channels FM. I had a post MARC 2 Watt version.

Danita 640
Danita 640

The Danita 640 was the only 40 channel FM radio I used. A few years after the MARC regulation it was allowed to use 40 channels 2 Watt FM. I can’t recall wich year this was but I believe somewhere around 1978. Much later 4 Watt FM and 1 Watt AM was allowed here in the Netherlands. At this moment 40 channels AM  / FM / SSB is allowed, 1 Watt AM, 4 Watt FM and 4 Watt PEP SSB.

The Danita 640 was primary used for packet radio. I operated SO1BBS. It was also a node. My own packet callsign was CB1KMS. I had 2 active users, Michel CB1MAS and Bas CB1PTB. Bas is now known as PE4BAS. He has a nice blog running, very informative.

In 1996 I moved form Schiermonnikoog to Deventer and practically this was the end of my CB activities. I did set up the Danita for packet use but packet radio was not much used in this area. There were 2 BBS stations I could reach but they were not linked to the same system i was before and there was not much to use on system. I still had the HAM Jumbo but did not use that one on this location.

I did go on with my other radio hobby, Short Wave listening. That is written in another story…